May 29, 2004

Repetitive sequences that shape the human transcriptome

FEBS Letters
Anna Jasinska, Wlodzimierz J Krzyzosiak

Abstract

Only a small portion of the total RNA transcribed in human cells becomes mature mRNA and constitutes the human transcriptome, which is context-dependent and varies with development, physiology and pathology. A small fraction of different repetitive sequences, which make up more than half of the human genome, is retained in mature transcripts and shapes their function. Among them are short interspersed elements (SINEs), of which Alu sequences are most frequent, and simple sequence repeats, which come in many varieties. In this review, we have focused on the structural and functional role of Alu elements and trinucleotide repeats in transcripts.

Mentioned in this Paper

Establishment and Maintenance of Localization
Short Interspersed Nucleotide Elements
Short Tandem Repeat
Pathogenic Aspects
Biochemical Pathway
RNA Degradation
Exertion
Repetitive Region
Untranslated Regions
Pathogenesis

Related Feeds

Ataxia

Ataxia is a neurological condition characterized by lack of voluntary coordination of muscle movements including loss of coordination, balance, and speech. Discover the latest research on ataxia here.

Ataxias (MDS)

Ataxia is a neurological condition characterized by lack of voluntary coordination of muscle movements including loss of coordination, balance, and speech. Discover the latest research on ataxia here.

Breast Cancer: BRCA1 & BRCA2

Mutations involving BRCA1, found on chromosome 17, and BRCA2, found on chromosome 13, increase the risk for specific cancers, such as breast cancer. Discover the last research on breast cancer BRCA1 and BRCA2 here.

Ataxias

Ataxia is a neurological condition characterized by lack of voluntary coordination of muscle movements including loss of coordination, balance, and speech. Discover the latest research on ataxia here.

Batten Disease

Batten Disease is a group of nervous system disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipfuscinosis. This feed focuses on neurobiological and neuropathological aspects of this disease. Discover more here.

© 2020 Meta ULC. All rights reserved