Revisiting the Role of Csp Family Proteins in Regulating Clostridium difficile Spore Germination

Journal of Bacteriology
Yuzo Kevorkian, Aimee Shen

Abstract

Clostridium difficile causes considerable health care-associated gastrointestinal disease that is transmitted by its metabolically dormant spore form. Upon entering the gut, C. difficile spores germinate and outgrow to produce vegetative cells that release disease-causing toxins. C. difficile spore germination depends on the Csp family of (pseudo)proteases and the cortex hydrolase SleC. The CspC pseudoprotease functions as a bile salt germinant receptor that activates the protease CspB, which in turn proteolytically activates the SleC zymogen. Active SleC degrades the protective cortex layer, allowing spores to outgrow and resume metabolism. We previously showed that the CspA pseudoprotease domain, which is initially produced as a fusion to CspB, controls the incorporation of the CspC germinant receptor in mature spores. However, study of the individual Csp proteins has been complicated by the polar effects of TargeTron-based gene disruption on the cspBA-cspC operon. To overcome these limitations, we have used pyrE-based allelic exchange to create individual deletions of the regions encoding CspB, CspA, CspBA, and CspC in strain 630Δerm Our results indicate that stable CspA levels in sporulating cells depend on CspB and confirm...Continue Reading

References

Feb 1, 1995·Microbiology·T KarasawaS Nakamura
Sep 15, 2000·Journal of Bacteriology·M PaidhungatP Setlow
May 6, 2004·Journal of Bacteriology·Takao IgarashiPeter Setlow
Aug 30, 2007·Molecular Microbiology·Sean S DineenAbraham L Sonenshein
Nov 24, 2007·Annual Review of Microbiology·Adriano O Henriques, Charles P Moran
Feb 5, 2008·Journal of Bacteriology·Joseph A Sorg, Abraham L Sonenshein
May 13, 2008·Journal of Bacteriology·Daniel Paredes-SabjaMahfuzur R Sarker
Feb 24, 2009·Current Protocols in Microbiology·Joseph A Sorg, Sean S Dineen
Apr 14, 2009·Nature Methods·Daniel G GibsonHamilton O Smith
May 19, 2009·Journal of Microbiological Methods·John T HeapNigel P Minton
Jun 23, 2009·Journal of Bacteriology·Trevor D LawleyGordon Dougan
Nov 7, 2009·Journal of Microbiological Methods·John T HeapNigel P Minton
Aug 31, 2010·Applied and Environmental Microbiology·Trevor D LawleyGordon Dougan
Nov 30, 2010·Trends in Microbiology·Daniel Paredes-SabjaMahfuzur R Sarker
Jun 21, 2011·Annual Review of Microbiology·Karen C Carroll, John G Bartlett
Jan 13, 2012·Journal of Innate Immunity·Aimee Shen
May 23, 2012·Infection and Immunity·Laura J DeakinTrevor D Lawley
Jan 8, 2013·Journal of Bacteriology·Emily E PutnamAimee Shen
Jan 22, 2013·Journal of Bacteriology·Patima PermpoonpattanaSimon M Cutting
Feb 20, 2013·The Journal of Infectious Diseases·Amber HowertonErnesto Abel-Santos
Aug 21, 2013·PLoS Genetics·Kelly A FimlaidAimee Shen
Feb 4, 2014·Journal of Bacteriology·Peter Setlow
May 13, 2014·Trends in Microbiology·Daniel Paredes-SabjaJoseph A Sorg
Nov 14, 2014·Molecular Microbiology·Keyan PishdadianAimee Shen
Feb 26, 2015·The New England Journal of Medicine·Fernanda C LessaL Clifford McDonald
Aug 19, 2015·Current Biology : CB·Alexander Sturm, Jonathan Dworkin
Oct 22, 2015·Annual Review of Microbiology·Casey M Theriot, Vincent B Young
Jul 20, 2016·Journal of Bacteriology·Disha BhattacharjeeJoseph A Sorg
Aug 11, 2016·Methods in Molecular Biology·Aimee ShenKeyan Pishdadian
Aug 31, 2016·Nature Reviews. Microbiology·Michael C AbtEric G Pamer

❮ Previous
Next ❯

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Antifungals

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Aminoglycosides

Aminoglycoside is a medicinal and bacteriologic category of traditional Gram-negative antibacterial medications that inhibit protein synthesis and contain as a portion of the molecule an amino-modified glycoside. Discover the latest research on aminoglycoside here.

Antifungals (ASM)

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Aminoglycosides (ASM)

Aminoglycoside is a medicinal and bacteriologic category of traditional Gram-negative antibacterial medications that inhibit protein synthesis and contain as a portion of the molecule an amino-modified glycoside. Discover the latest research on aminoglycoside here.