Rhesus monkey rhadinovirus uses eph family receptors for entry into B cells and endothelial cells but not fibroblasts

PLoS Pathogens
Alexander Hahn, Ronald C Desrosiers

Abstract

Cellular Ephrin receptor tyrosine kinases (Ephrin receptors, Ephs) were found to interact efficiently with the gH/gL glycoprotein complex of the rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV). Since EphA2 was recently identified as a receptor for the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) (Hahn et al., Nature Medicine 2012), we analyzed RRV and KSHV in parallel with respect to Eph-binding and Eph-dependent entry. Ten of the 14 Eph proteins, including both A- and B-type, interacted with RRV gH/gL. Two RRV strains with markedly different gH/gL sequences exhibited similar but slightly different binding patterns to Ephs. gH/gL of KSHV displayed high affinity towards EphA2 but substantially weaker binding to only a few other Ephs of the A-type. Productive entry of RRV 26-95 into B cells and into endothelial cells was essentially completely dependent upon Ephs since expression of a GFP reporter cassette from recombinant virus could be blocked to greater than 95% by soluble Eph decoys using these cells. In contrast, entry of RRV into fibroblasts and epithelial cells was independent of Ephs by these same criteria. Even high concentrations and mixtures of soluble Eph decoys were not able to reduce by any appreciable extent the number of fibro...Continue Reading

References

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Citations

Nov 22, 2013·Journal of Virology·Stephen J DolleryEdward A Berger
Feb 15, 2014·Saudi Journal of Ophthalmology : Official Journal of the Saudi Ophthalmological Society·Basilio ColligrisJesus Pintor
Jan 2, 2020·Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS·Jia WangZailong Qin
Nov 23, 2019·Viruses·Stephen J Dollery
Nov 26, 2020·Nature Communications·Chao SuJinghua Yan
Jan 23, 2021·Viruses·Emma van der MeulenGeorgia Schäfer
Mar 4, 2021·PLoS Pathogens·Anna K GroßkopfAlexander S Hahn
Jun 23, 2020·Pharmacological Research : the Official Journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society·Esther C W de BoerMarit J van Gils

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Methods Mentioned

BETA
immunoprecipitation
pulldown
electrophoresis
co-immunoprecipitations
flow cytometry
dot blot
PCR
transfection
amino acid exchange

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