Risk factors for the outcome of cirrhotic patients with soft tissue infections

Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Ber-Ming LiuHsueh-Wen Chang

Abstract

The aims of this study were to identify risk factors that influence outcomes of cirrhotic patients with soft tissue infections and to describe specific management for such patients. Soft tissue infections account for 11% of infections overall in cirrhotic patients and the severe form of necrotizing infection carries a high mortality rate. It is essential that clinicians make an early diagnosis and start appropriate treatment to improve outcomes of cirrhotic patients with soft tissue infections. Cirrhotic patients who had been admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of soft tissue infection from June 1, 2003 to June 1, 2005 were included in this retrospective study. Clinical manifestations, laboratory data, and microbiologic results were recorded and compared between survivor and nonsurvivor groups. There was a total of 118 episodes of admission for soft tissue infection with 26 episodes resulting in mortality and 92 in survival. The following clinical parameters showed significant differences between the 2 groups: Child-Pugh grade C, pain, altered consciousness, emergence of hemorrhagic bullae, and local injury. The following laboratory data showed significant differences between the 2 groups: appearance of band form, serum...Continue Reading

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Citations

Nov 26, 2015·Journal of Hepatology·UNKNOWN European Association for the Study of the Liver. Electronic address: easloffice@easloffice.eu
Mar 15, 2011·Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association·Alexander R BonnelK Rajender Reddy
May 7, 2010·Gastroenterología y hepatología·Pablo BellotJosé Such
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Jun 5, 2012·World Journal of Hepatology·Chalermrat Bunchorntavakul, Disaya Chavalitdhamrong
Mar 21, 2020·Surgical Infections·Zaid Al-QurayshiEmad Kandil
Nov 11, 2019·Clinics and Research in Hepatology and Gastroenterology·Manon AllaireThông Dao
Oct 29, 2009·Surgical Infections·Addison K MayUNKNOWN Surgical Infection Society

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