Apr 1, 1992

Risk for cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is associated with the HLA-DR3/4 phenotype in type I diabetes mellitus

Annals of Internal Medicine
J BarzilayA S Krolewski

Abstract

To identify risk factors for the development of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in patients with juvenile-onset type I diabetes mellitus. Cross-sectional examination of an inception cohort 15 to 21 years after the onset of diabetes. Outpatient diabetes clinic. Seventy-nine patients with type I diabetes who experienced onset of disease before 21 years of age and who were followed for 15 to 21 years. Autonomic nerve function was evaluated in all patients using deep breathing and tilt tests. On the basis of these tests, an index of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was derived and patients were classified as having intact, mildly impaired, or significantly impaired autonomic function. The group with significantly impaired function had a higher mean hemoglobin A1 at the time of examination than the group without impairment, yet the groups did not differ regarding glycemic control during the first decade of diabetes. The HLA-DR3/4 phenotype was present in more than 50% of the patients with significant autonomic dysfunction and conferred relative odds of 6.2 (95% CI, 1.7 to 23.3) for the development of autonomic neuropathy when compared with other HLA-DR phenotypes. Sex, percent ideal body weight, and smoking did not have a sta...Continue Reading

  • References
  • Citations6

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations6

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Autonomic Nerve Structure
HLA-DR4 Antigen
Weighing Patient
Incidence Studies
Complication
Entire Autonomic Nerve
Tilt (brand of fungicide)
HLA-DR Antigens
Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent
Paraneoplastic Syndromes, Nervous System

About this Paper

Related Feeds

Autoimmune Diabetes & Tolerance

Patients with type I diabetes lack insulin-producing beta cells due to the loss of immunological tolerance and autoimmune disease. Discover the latest research on targeting tolerance to prevent diabetes.

Antifungals (ASM)

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Antifungals

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.