PMID: 13894242Feb 1, 1962

Rupture of bacteria by explosive decompression

Journal of Bacteriology
J W FOSTERT A MAAG

Abstract

Foster, John W. (University of Georgia, Athens), Robert M. Cowan, and Ted A. Maag. Rupture of bacteria by explosive decompression. J. Bacteriol. 83:330-334. 1962.-A device is described for instantaneously rupturing bacteria and other cells in a closed system under controlled conditions by explosive decompression. With this device, 31 to 59% of Serratia marcescens, ranging up to 20 mg (dry wt) of cells per ml, were ruptured after nitrogen saturation at 1740 psi. Under similar conditions, 10 to 25% of Brucella abortus and Staphylococcus aureus were ruptured. Rupture of these organisms produced readily separable cell walls. Centrifugation in linear glycerol gradients was applied to further separate cell walls from debris. Mycoplasma gallinarum, Leptospira pomona, and Eimeria tenella (avian coccidia) oöcysts were also broken up by the decompression chamber. Pressure and duration of saturation of cells with gas affected rupture efficiency. Within the limits of this study, concentration of organisms and volume of suspensions did not have a definite effect.

Citations

Jan 20, 2006·Critical Reviews in Biotechnology·K Khosravi-Darani, E Vasheghani-Farahani
Jun 15, 2010·Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition·Kianoush Khosravi-Darani
Nov 5, 2003·Biotechnology and Bioengineering·S Spilimbergo, A Bertucco
Jan 1, 1979·Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part. B, Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes·V O Biederbeck
Mar 1, 2012·Biotechnology and Bioengineering·A Colas de la NoueP Gervais
May 28, 2019·Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B, Applied Biomaterials·Nilza RibeiroAna L Oliveira
Sep 16, 2020·Soft Matter·Faustine GomandClaire Gaiani
Sep 25, 2008·Biotechnology and Bioengineering·V EspinasseP Gervais
May 3, 2006·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·Patrick J GintyKevin M Shakesheff

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