Sea urchin arylsulfatase insulator exerts its anti-silencing effect without interacting with the nuclear matrix

Journal of Molecular Biology
S HinoM Matsuoka

Abstract

Chromatin insulators have been shown to stabilize transgene expression. Although insulators have been suggested to regulate the subcellular localization of chromosomes, it is still unclear whether this property is important for their anti-silencing activity. To investigate the underlying mechanisms governing the anti-silencing function of insulators, we studied the association of sea urchin arylsulfatase insulator (ArsI) with the nuclear matrix, which is a key component of the subnuclear localization of the genome. ArsI did not potentiate the nuclear matrix association with the transgene, even though it showed strong anti-silencing activity. This observation was in clear contrast to the results of the experiment using a human interferon-beta scaffold attachment region, in which the anti-silencing effect coincided with the enhanced matrix association. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses suggested that the absence of the matrix binding by ArsI was due to a lack of its binding to CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), a protein known to be associated with matrix binding by chicken beta-globin insulator. Furthermore, ArsI maintained the nucleosome occupancy within the transgene at a constant level during long-term culture, although ArsI i...Continue Reading

References

Jul 26, 2000·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·D W EmeryG Stamatoyannopoulos
Dec 7, 2000·Molecular Cell·T I GerasimovaVictor G Corces
Sep 6, 2001·BioEssays : News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology·J C Eissenberg
Feb 5, 2002·Genes & Development·A G WestGary Felsenfeld
Nov 1, 2002·Cell·Mariano Labrador, Victor G Corces
Mar 11, 2003·Reviews in Medical Virology·Hideo IbaTaiji Ito
Aug 20, 2003·The Journal of Cell Biology·Keith Byrd, Victor G Corces
Dec 3, 2003·Molecular and Cellular Biology·Michaël WeberThierry Forné
Mar 5, 2004·Journal of Cell Science·Henry H Q HengStephen A Krawetz
Jun 29, 2004·BioEssays : News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology·Félix Recillas-TargaCatherine M Farrell

Citations

Aug 29, 2009·BMC Molecular Biology·Peter HegerEinhard Schierenberg
Sep 6, 2012·Development·Mamiko YajimaGary M Wessel
Aug 23, 2006·Genes to Cells : Devoted to Molecular & Cellular Mechanisms·Satoshi WatanabeKoji Akasaka

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Antifungals (ASM)

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

CREs: Gene & Cell Therapy

Gene and cell therapy advances have shown promising outcomes for several diseases. The role of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) is crucial in the design of gene therapy vectors. Here is the latest research on CREs in gene and cell therapy.

Antifungals

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.