Apr 2, 2020

Disconnection somewhere down the line: Multivariate lesion-symptom mapping of the line bisection error

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
D. WiesenChristoph Sperber

Abstract

Line Bisection is a simple task frequently used in stroke patients to diagnose disorders of spatial attention characterized by a directional bisection bias to the ipsilesional side. However, previous anatomical and behavioural findings are contradictory, and its diagnostic validity has been challenged over the last decade. We hereby aimed to re-analyse the anatomical foundation of pathological line bisection by using multivariate lesion-symptom mapping and disconnection-symptom mapping based on support vector regression in a sample of 163 right hemispheric acute stroke patients. Cortical damage primarily to right parietal areas, particularly the inferior parietal lobe, including the angular gyrus, as well as damage to the right basal ganglia contributed to the pathology. Within the right hemisphere, affection of the superior longitudinal (I, II and III) and arcuate fasciculi as well as the internal capsule led to line bisection errors. Moreover, white matter affection of interhemispheric fibre bundles, such as the anterior commissure and posterior parts of the corpus callosum, projecting into the left hemisphere, seem to play a role predicting pathological deviation. Our results indicate that pathological line bisection is not ...Continue Reading

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