Serum prealbumin is a prognostic indicator in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

The Clinical Respiratory Journal
Biyun LiChen Wang

Abstract

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal interstitial lung disease characterized by variable progression. The prealbumin (PA) is a parameter in a routine blood biochemistry examination. We sought to investigate the prognostic value in IPF patients. To evaluate the prognosis value in patients with IPF. Blood biochemistry examination, demographics, pulmonary function data from patients with IPF consulted in Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital and China-Japan Friendship Hospital between July 2012 and December 2016 were collected. Infection, liver and kidney dysfunction and lung transplantation are excluded from the cohort. The result of multivariate Cox analysis showed that PA was significant prognostic indicator of survival along with BMI, FVC, serum albumin protein and serum global protein. The patients with PA concentration <0.2 mg/L had shorter survival compared with those whose PA were normal. Although the survival had no significant difference between the patients with PA concentration < 0.2 mg/L and albumin < 35 g/L and those with PA concentration < 0.2 mg/L, the average survival time of patients with PA concentration < 0.2 mg/L and albumin < 35 g/L were shorter. Our study indicated that IPF patients with PA concentration < 0....Continue Reading

References

Oct 10, 1998·Respirology : Official Journal of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology·J FujitaJ Takahara
Nov 17, 1998·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·Akihito YokoyamaK Hiwada
Sep 16, 2000·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·H TakahashiS Abe
Jul 4, 2001·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·N MogulkocGreater Manchester Pulmonary Fibrosis Consortium
Oct 24, 2001·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·T E KingR M Cherniack
May 30, 2003·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·Harold R CollardKevin K Brown
Jun 7, 2003·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·Panagiota I LatsiAthol U Wells
Aug 15, 2003·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·Vibha N LamaFernando J Martinez
Jun 22, 2005·Annals of Internal Medicine·Fernando J MartinezIPF Study Group
Jan 18, 2006·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·Hanno H LeuchteJuergen Behr
Mar 22, 2006·Respirology : Official Journal of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology·Akihito YokoyamaNobuoki Kohno
Mar 24, 2007·Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine : CCLM·A Myron JohnsonScientific Division Committee on Plasma Proteins (C-PP), International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medic
Jul 29, 2008·Clinical Biochemistry·Arun DevakondaLarry H Bernstein
Dec 10, 2008·The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition·Mehdi RambodKamyar Kalantar-Zadeh
Dec 10, 2008·Amyloid : the International Journal of Experimental and Clinical Investigation : the Official Journal of the International Society of Amyloidosis·Joel BuxbaumLawreen H Connors
Jan 31, 2009·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·Antje PrasseJoachim Müller-Quernheim
Apr 8, 2011·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·Ganesh RaghuATS/ERS/JRS/ALAT Committee on Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Jan 14, 2012·British Journal of Cancer·H S AhnC W Kim
May 16, 2012·Annals of Internal Medicine·Brett LeyHarold R Collard
Jul 16, 2015·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·Ganesh RaghuLatin American Thoracic Association
Feb 24, 2016·Gastroenterology Research and Practice·Ali EsfahaniZohreh Ghoreishi

Related Concepts

Trending Feeds

COVID-19

Coronaviruses encompass a large family of viruses that cause the common cold as well as more serious diseases, such as the ongoing outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19; formally known as 2019-nCoV). Coronaviruses can spread from animals to humans; symptoms include fever, cough, shortness of breath, and breathing difficulties; in more severe cases, infection can lead to death. This feed covers recent research on COVID-19.

STING Receptor Agonists

Stimulator of IFN genes (STING) are a group of transmembrane proteins that are involved in the induction of type I interferon that is important in the innate immune response. The stimulation of STING has been an active area of research in the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Here is the latest research on STING receptor agonists.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic fatigue syndrome is a disease characterized by unexplained disabling fatigue; the pathology of which is incompletely understood. Discover the latest research on chronic fatigue syndrome here.

Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy

Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathies are a group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders characterized clinically by loss of sensation and autonomic dysfunction. Here is the latest research on these neuropathies.

Glut1 Deficiency

Glut1 deficiency, an autosomal dominant, genetic metabolic disorder associated with a deficiency of GLUT1, the protein that transports glucose across the blood brain barrier, is characterized by mental and motor developmental delays and infantile seizures. Follow the latest research on Glut1 deficiency with this feed.

Regulation of Vocal-Motor Plasticity

Dopaminergic projections to the basal ganglia and nucleus accumbens shape the learning and plasticity of motivated behaviors across species including the regulation of vocal-motor plasticity and performance in songbirds. Discover the latest research on the regulation of vocal-motor plasticity here.

Neural Activity: Imaging

Imaging of neural activity in vivo has developed rapidly recently with the advancement of fluorescence microscopy, including new applications using miniaturized microscopes (miniscopes). This feed follows the progress in this growing field.

Nodding Syndrome

Nodding Syndrome is a neurological and epileptiform disorder characterized by psychomotor, mental, and growth retardation. Discover the latest research on Nodding Syndrome here.

LRRK2 & Microtubules

Mutations in the LRRK2 gene are risk-factors for developing Parkinson’s disease (PD). LRRK2 mutations in PD have been shown to enhance its association with microtubules. Here is the latest research.