PMID: 46035Jan 11, 1975

Shigellosis in day-care centres

Lancet
J B WeissmanJ N Lewis

Abstract

Increasing numbers of outbreaks of shigellosis in day-care centres have been reported to the Center for Disease Control since 1972. Investigations reveal certain unique epidemiological features of shigellosis in this setting. Attack-rates tend to be higher than in outbreaks in primary schools, and epidemiologically these outbreaks resemble those in custodial institutions. Person-to-person transmission is the usual mode of spread; secondary spread within households is common, and there may also be significant spread to the community at large. Preventive measures should be directed at children, staff, and the day-care centre environment. Control of outbreaks may require closing the centre and must include separation of infected and uninfected persons, judicious use of antibiotics, and correction of deficiencies in hygiene and health education. Improved surveillance of shigellosis in day-care centres will be an aid in efforts toward controlling this increasingly important public-health problem.

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Citations

Oct 1, 1973·The Journal of Infectious Diseases·J B WeissmanE J Gangarosa

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