Short communication: effect of pomegranate-residue supplement on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst shedding in neonatal calves

Journal of Dairy Science
S Weyl-FeinsteinA Shabtay

Abstract

Cryptosporidium parvum is considered one of the most common enteropathogens, responsible for the high incidence of diarrhea and deleterious implications on immunity and health in neonatal calves. The pomegranate is well known for its health-promoting properties. Two experiments were designed to test the antiparasitical and antidiarrheal effects of concentrated pomegranate extract (CPE) supplement in milk in neonatal Holstein calves. Forty-one calves were randomly divided into control (n=20) and treatment (n=21) groups. For the first experiment, the treatment group was supplemented with 3.75% CPE in the daily milk ration, between 3 and 14 d of age, whereas the control group received only milk. Fecal samples were collected between d 5 and 13 to quantify Cryptosporidium oocysts, and the duration and intensity of diarrhea were evaluated. Reduced fecal oocyst count and diarrhea intensity and duration were revealed in the 3.75% CPE calves. No difference was noted in average daily gain between groups. In a second experiment, which was designed to test the effect of a lower CPE concentration (0.6% of daily milk allocation), no effects on fecal oocyst count and average daily gain were observed. However, compared with control, the lower ...Continue Reading

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Citations

Sep 15, 2016·Parasite : Journal De La Société Française De Parasitologie·Klaus TeichmannFranz Hadacek
Sep 2, 2018·Applied and Environmental Microbiology·Bruno C M Oliveira, Giovanni Widmer
Dec 31, 2020·Biotechnology Reports·Azeddin El BarnossiAbdelilah Iraqi Housseini

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