Single-dose parenteral antibiotics as prophylaxis against wound infections in colonic operations

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
K C HanelE Reiss-Levy

Abstract

A study of 77 patients undergoing elective operations on the colon and rectum, where wounds were subject to contamination by fecal flora, did not demonstrate that the addition of a preoperative oral regime to parenteral antibiotics alone further decreased the incidence of wound infection. The authors feel that the use of single-dose clindamycin and cephazolin intravenously preoperatively has been shown to be a very effective method of preventing wound infection in elective colonic resections.

References

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