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Social network plasticity decreases disease transmission in a eusocial insect

Science

Nov 24, 2018

Nathalie StroeymeytLaurent Keller

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Abstract

Animal social networks are shaped by multiple selection pressures, including the need to ensure efficient communication and functioning while simultaneously limiting disease transmission. Social animals could potentially further reduce epidemic risk by altering their social networks in ...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Pathogenic Organism
Harassment, Non-Sexual
Neuronal Plasticity
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Tracking
Disease Transmission
Lasius niger
Arbovirus Encephalitis
Inhibition of Synaptic Transmission
Simulation
906
34
1
185
1
Paper Details
References
  • References33
  • Citations5
1234
  • References33
  • Citations5
1

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Social network plasticity decreases disease transmission in a eusocial insect

Science

Nov 24, 2018

Nathalie StroeymeytLaurent Keller

PMID: 30467168

DOI: 10.1126/science.aat4793

Abstract

Animal social networks are shaped by multiple selection pressures, including the need to ensure efficient communication and functioning while simultaneously limiting disease transmission. Social animals could potentially further reduce epidemic risk by altering their social networks in ...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Pathogenic Organism
Harassment, Non-Sexual
Neuronal Plasticity
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Tracking
Disease Transmission
Lasius niger
Arbovirus Encephalitis
Inhibition of Synaptic Transmission
Simulation
906
34
1
185
1

Feeds With Similar Papers

Science eTOC

Science Magazine is a peer-reviewed academic journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Find the latest research from Science here.

General Biology Journal eTOCs

Discover the latest general biology research in this collection of the top biology journals.

Related Papers

Zhurnal vyssheĭ nervnoĭ deiatelnosti imeni I P Pavlova

Formation of a conditioned reflex to color in the ant, Lasius niger L

Zhurnal vyssheĭ nervnoĭ deiatelnosti imeni I P PavlovaSeptember 1, 1986
A N Inozemtsev, E N Ostrovenko
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences

Opposing effects of allogrooming on disease transmission in ant societies

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological SciencesApril 15, 2015
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Paper Details
References
  • References33
  • Citations5
1234
  • References33
  • Citations5
1

Download from

Publisher
PubMed
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