Apr 9, 2020

Regulation of light harvesting in Chlamydomonas: two protein phosphatases are involved in state transitions

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Zheya ShengMichel Goldschmidt-Clermont

Abstract

Protein phosphorylation plays important roles in short-term regulation of photosynthetic electron transfer. In a mechanism known as state transitions, the kinase STATE TRANSITION 7 (STT7) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii phosphorylates components of light-harvesting antenna complex II (LHCII). This reversible phosphorylation governs the dynamic allocation of a part of LHCII to photosystem I or photosystem II, depending on light conditions and metabolic demands. Little is however known in the green alga on the counteracting phosphatase(s). In Arabidopsis, the homologous kinase STN7 is specifically antagonized by PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 1/THYLAKOID-ASSOCIATED PHOSPHATASE 38 (PPH1/TAP38). Furthermore, the paralogous kinase STN8 and the countering phosphatase PHOTOSYSTEM II PHOSPHATASE (PBCP), which count subunits of PSII amongst their major targets, influence thylakoid architecture and high-light tolerance. Here we analyze state transitions in C. reinhardtii mutants of the two homologous phosphatases, CrPPH1 and CrPBCP. The transition from state 2 to state 1 is retarded in pph1, and surprisingly also in pbcp. However both mutants can eventually return to state 1. In contrast, the double mutant pph1;pbcp appears strongly locked in state 2....Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Vertebrates
Genome
Sample Fixation
Genomics
Adaptation
Polygene
Alleles
Sweep
Plethodon virginia
Fixation - Action

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