Oct 10, 1976

Steroid 5alpha-reductase in cultured human fibroblasts. Biochemical and genetic evidence for two distinct enzyme activities

The Journal of Biological Chemistry
R J Moore, J D Wilson

Abstract

Various properties of the steroid 5alpha-reductase have been examined in cell-free extracts of skin and of fibroblasts cultured from genital and nongenital skin from control subjects and from patients with several forms of male pseudohermaphroditism. When 20alpha-hydroxy-4-[1,2-3H] pregnen-3-one was used as substrate, two 5alpha-reductase activities could be demonstrated in intact skin and cultured fibroblasts. The major activity, previously described for microsomes from human prepuce and extracts of cultured foreskin fibroblasts, is characterized by a narrow pH optimum near 5.5 and is limited to fibroblasts derived from genital skin. A second activity, not limited by the site of biopsy, has been demonstrated over a higher and broader range of pH (from 7 to 9); this enzyme activity is found in both genital and nongenital skin and in fibroblasts cultured from all skin regions. Whereas there is wide variability in the activity at pH 5.5 in genital skin fibroblasts, the activity at pH 7 to 9 is similar in fibroblasts derived from all anatomical sites. The two activities exhibit different kinetics with respect to steroid substrate and are also dissimilar in their subcellular distributions. Other properties, such as coenzyme require...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

SRD5A1
Disorders of Sex Development
Skin
Fibroblasts
Intersexuality
Accessory Sex Organs, Male
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Accessory Sex Organs, Female

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