Strain improvement of Sporolactobacillus inulinus ATCC 15538 for acid tolerance and production of D-lactic acid by genome shuffling

Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Huijie ZhengXueming Zhao

Abstract

Improvement of acid tolerance and production of D-lactic acid by Sporolactobacillus inulinus ATCC 15538 was performed by using recursive protoplast fusion in a genome shuffling format. The starting population was generated by ultraviolet irradiation, diethyl sulfate mutagenesis, and pH-gradient filter and then, subjected for the recursive protoplast fusion. The concentration of lysozyme, time, and temperature for enzyme treatment were optimized by response surface methodology based on the central composite design. Based on contour plots and variance analysis, the model predicted a maximum Y (multiply protoplasts formation ratio by protoplasts regeneration ratio), 60.4%, and the corresponding above used values were 7.75 mg/ml lysozyme, 1.59 h, and 38 degrees C. A pH-5-resistant recombinant, F3-4, was obtained after three rounds of genome shuffling and its production of D-lactic acid reached 93.4 g/l in a 5 L bioreactor, which was increased by 39.8% and 119% in comparison with that of UV generated strain and the original strain S. inulinus ATCC 15538, respectively. The subculture experiments indicated that F3-4 was genetically stable.

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Citations

Mar 7, 2014·Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology·Damien Biot-Pelletier, Vincent J J Martin
Aug 16, 2012·Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology·Lu ZhengBingfang He
May 10, 2013·Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology·Ji ZhangWensheng Xiang
Mar 2, 2016·World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology·Shu-Bo LiZong-Wen Pang
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Dec 2, 2016·Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology·Xiangmin FuShengde Zhou
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Oct 23, 2020·Heliyon·Elahe Abedi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher Hashemi

Related Concepts

Biotechnology
DNA, Bacterial
Fermentation
Glucose, (beta-D)-Isomer
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Industrial Microbiology
Protoplasts
Black Light, Ultraviolet
Variation (Genetics)
Mutagenesis Process

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