Jan 1, 1985

Streptococcus-Escherichia coli shuttle vector pSA3 and its use in the cloning of streptococcal genes

Applied and Environmental Microbiology
M L Dao, J J Ferretti

Abstract

A shuttle vector that can replicate in both Streptococcus spp. and Escherichia coli has been constructed by joining the E. coli plasmid pACYC184 (chloramphenicol and tetracycline resistance) to the streptococcal plasmid pGB305 (erythromycin resistance). The resulting chimeric plasmid is designated pSA3 (chloramphenicol, erythromycin, and tetracycline resistance) and has seven unique restriction sites: EcoRI, EcoRV, BamHI, SalI, XbaI, NruI, and SphI. Molecular cloning into the EcoRI or EcoRV site results in inactivation of chloramphenicol resistance, and cloning into the BamHI, SalI, or SphI site results in inactivation of tetracycline resistance in E. coli. pSA3 was transformed and was stable in Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans in the presence of erythromycin. We have used pSA3 to construct a library of the S. mutans GS5 genome in E. coli, and expression of surface antigens in this heterologous host has been confirmed with S. mutans antiserum. A previously cloned determinant that specifies streptokinase was subcloned into pSA3, and this recombinant plasmid was stable in the presence of a selective pressure and expressed streptokinase activity in E. coli, S. sanguis (Challis), and S. mutans.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Tetracycline Antibiotics
Antibiotic Resistance, Microbial
Tetracyclines
Shuttle Vectors
Erythromycin
Alkalescens-Dispar Group
Immune Sera
Chimera Organism
Streptococcus
SNCAIP

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