Dec 2, 2010

Substrate docking to γ-secretase allows access of γ-secretase modulators to an allosteric site

Nature Communications
Kengo UemuraOksana Berezovska

Abstract

γ-Secretase generates the peptides of Alzheimer's disease, Aβ(40) and Aβ(42), by cleaving the amyloid precursor protein within its transmembrane domain. γ-Secretase also cleaves numerous other substrates, raising concerns about γ-secretase inhibitor off-target effects. Another important class of drugs, γ-secretase modulators, alter the cleavage site of γ-secretase on amyloid precursor protein, changing the Aβ(42)/Aβ(40) ratio, and are thus a promising therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease. However, the target for γ-secretase modulators is uncertain, with some data suggesting that they function on γ-secretase, whereas others support their binding to the amyloid precursor. In this paper we address this controversy by using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay to examine whether γ-secretase modulators alter Presenilin-1/γ-secretase conformation in intact cells in the absence of its natural substrates such as amyloid precursor protein and Notch. We report that the γ-secretase allosteric site is located within the γ-secretase complex, but substrate docking is needed for γ-secretase modulators to access this site.

Mentioned in this Paper

APP protein, human
Allosteric Site
Notch
Presenilin-1
Transmembrane Domain
Amyloid Beta Precursor Protein Measurement
Cytokinesis of the Fertilized Ovum
Alzheimer's Disease
Amyloid Neuropathies
Docking -molecular Interaction

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