PMID: 1913513Oct 15, 1991Paper

Sufficient levels of quinine in the serum circumvent the multidrug resistance of the human leukemic cell line K562/ADM

Cancer
Eric SolaryH Guy

Abstract

Reversal of multidrug drug resistance (MDR) has been achieved in vitro by a variety of agents including verapamil, quinidine, cyclosporine A, and amiodarone. The toxicity of these agents precludes the achievement of sufficient levels in the serum to circumvent efficiently the MDR in vivo. The authors previously demonstrated that quinine, the widely used antimalarial agent, is able to reverse primary resistance of rat colon cancer cells to anthracyclines. In this report, the efficiency of quinine formiate in reversing the doxorubicin (ADM) (Adriamycin, Adria Laboratories, Columbus, OH) resistance of the well-defined MDR human leukemic cell line K562/ADM was demonstrated. In culture medium, quinine is slightly less effective than verapamil in increasing the cytotoxicity and uptake of ADM when both drugs are used at the same concentration. A nontoxic dose of 5 micrograms/ml is necessary to reverse the MDR in K562/ADM cells. In patients receiving quinine formiate in a continuous intravenous infusion, a significant correlation (r = 0.84) was found between the serum levels of quinine and the ability of sera to increase ADM uptake in K562/ADM cells. When quinine is administered at a conventional dose (25 to 30 mg/kg/d), serum levels c...Continue Reading

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