DOI: 10.1101/507202Dec 28, 2018Paper

Super-enhancer impairment is a link between MLL4 inactivated lung tumors and their vulnerability to glycolysis pathway inhibition

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Hunain AlamMinGyu Lee

Abstract

Epigenetic modifiers often harbor loss-of-function mutations in lung cancer, but their tumor-suppressive roles are poorly characterized. Here we show that lung-specific loss of the gene encoding the histone methyltransferase MLL4 (alias KMT2D; a COMPASS-like enzyme), which is ranked the most highly inactivated epigenetic modifier in lung cancer, strongly promotes lung adenocarcinoma in mice. Mll4 loss upregulated tumor-promoting programs, including glycolysis. The pharmacological inhibition of glycolysis preferentially impeded tumorigenic growth of human lung cancer cells bearing MLL4-inactivating mutations. Mll4 loss widely impaired epigenomic signals for super-enhancers and enhancers, including the super-enhancer for the circadian rhythm repressor gene Per2, and decreased Per2 expression. Per2 downregulated several glycolytic pathway genes. These findings uncover a distinct tumor-suppressive epigenetic mechanism in which MLL4 enhances Per2-mediated repression of pro-tumorigenic glycolytic genes via super-enhancer activation to suppress lung adenocarcinoma tumorigenesis and also implicate a glycolysis-targeting strategy as a therapeutic intervention for the treatment of MLL4-mutant lung cancer.

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Cancer Epigenetics & Metabolism (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. This feed focuses on the relationship between cell metabolism, epigenetics and tumor differentiation.

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.

Cancer Epigenetics (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. Here is the latest research on cancer epigenetics.

Cell Signaling & Cancer Epigenetics (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. This feed covers the latest research on signaling and epigenetics in cell growth and cancer.

Cancer Epigenetics

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. Here is the latest research on cancer epigenetics.

Cancer Epigenetics & Methyl-CpG (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. Here is the latest research on cancer epigenetics and methyl-CpG binding proteins including ZBTB38.

Cancer Epigenetics and Senescence (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may be involved in regulating senescence in cancer cells. This feed captures the latest research on cancer epigenetics and senescence.