Sep 8, 1995

TEL1, an S. cerevisiae homolog of the human gene mutated in ataxia telangiectasia, is functionally related to the yeast checkpoint gene MEC1

Cell
D M MorrowP Hieter

Abstract

Patients with the genetic disorder ataxia telangiectasia (AT) have mutations in the AT mutated (ATM) gene, which is homologous to TEL1 and the checkpoint gene MEC1. A tel1 deletion mutant, unlike a mec1 deletion, is viable and does not exhibit increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. However, increased dosage of TEL1 rescues sensitivity of a mec1 mutant, mec1-1, to DNA-damaging agents and rescues viability of a mec1 disruption. mec1-1 tel1 delta 1 double mutants are synergistically sensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including radiomimetic drugs. These data indicate that TEL1 and MEC1 are functionally related and that functions of the ATM gene are apparently divided between at least two S. cerevisiae homologs.

Mentioned in this Paper

Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Intracellular Signaling Proteins
Gene Deletion Abnormality
Homologous Sequences, Amino Acid
Human gene
TEL1 protein, S cerevisiae
Genes, Fungal
ATM gene
Deletion Mutation
ATR gene

About this Paper

Related Feeds

Ataxia telangiectasia

Ataxia telangiectasia is a rare neurodegenerative diseases caused by defects in the ATM gene, which is involved in DNA damage recognition and repair pathways. Here is the latest research on this autosomal recessive disease.

Cell Checkpoints & Regulators

Cell cycle checkpoints are a series of complex checkpoint mechanisms that detect DNA abnormalities and ensure that DNA replication and repair are complete before cell division. They are primarily regulated by cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases, and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Here is the latest research.

Ataxia telangiectasia (MDS)

Ataxia telangiectasia is a rare neurodegenerative diseases caused by defects in the ATM gene, which is involved in DNA damage recognition and repair pathways. Here is the latest research on this autosomal recessive disease.