May 23, 2014

The bicomponent pore-forming leucocidins of Staphylococcus aureus

Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews : MMBR
Francis Alonzo, Victor J Torres

Abstract

The ability to produce water-soluble proteins with the capacity to oligomerize and form pores within cellular lipid bilayers is a trait conserved among nearly all forms of life, including humans, single-celled eukaryotes, and numerous bacterial species. In bacteria, some of the most notable pore-forming molecules are protein toxins that interact with mammalian cell membranes to promote lysis, deliver effectors, and modulate cellular homeostasis. Of the bacterial species capable of producing pore-forming toxic molecules, the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most notorious. S. aureus can produce seven different pore-forming protein toxins, all of which are believed to play a unique role in promoting the ability of the organism to cause disease in humans and other mammals. The most diverse of these pore-forming toxins, in terms of both functional activity and global representation within S. aureus clinical isolates, are the bicomponent leucocidins. From the first description of their activity on host immune cells over 100 years ago to the detailed investigations of their biochemical function today, the leucocidins remain at the forefront of S. aureus pathogenesis research initiatives. Study of their mode ...Continue Reading

Mentioned in this Paper

Pathologic Cytolysis
Pathogenic Aspects
Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial
Pathogenesis
Cellular Homeostasis
Pathogenicity
Pathogenic Organism
Toxin
Thylacodes aureus
Staphylococcal Infections

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