PMID: 3531139Jul 1, 1986

The effect of citric acid on growth of proteolytic strains of Clostridium botulinum

The Journal of Applied Bacteriology
A F Graham, B M Lund

Abstract

In strictly anaerobic conditions in a culture medium adjusted to pH 5.2 with HCl and incubated at 30 degrees C, inocula containing less than 10 vegetative bacteria of Clostridium botulinum ZK3 (type A) multiplied to give greater than 10(8) bacteria per ml in 3 d. Growth from an inoculum of between 10 and 100 spores occurred after a delay of 10-20 weeks. Citric acid concentrations of 10-50 mmol/l at pH 5.2 inhibited growth from both vegetative bacteria and spore inocula, a concentration of 50 mmol/l increasing the number of vegetative bacteria or of spores required to produce growth by a factor of approximately 10(6). The citric acid also reduced the concentration of free Ca2+ in the medium. The inhibitory effect of citric acid on vegetative bacteria at pH 5.2 could be prevented by the addition of Ca2+ or Mg2+ and greatly reduced by Fe2+ and Mn2+. The addition of Ca2+, but not of the remaining divalent metal ions, restored the concentration of free Ca2+ in the medium to that in the citrate-free medium. The inhibitory effect of citric acid on growth from a spore inoculum was only partially prevented by Ca2+. Citric acid (50 mmol/l) did not inhibit growth of strain ZK3 at pH 6 despite the greater chelating activity of citrate at p...Continue Reading

References

Dec 1, 1968·The Journal of Applied Bacteriology·E M Barnes, C S Impey
Sep 1, 1983·Reviews of Infectious Diseases·E Skamene
Dec 1, 1983·Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology·G A Thompson, R J Watling
Feb 1, 1982·The Journal of Applied Bacteriology·J P SmeltC T Verrips
Nov 1, 1962·Journal of Bacteriology·C G RAMMELL
Jan 1, 1964·Biochemistry·W J O'SULLIVAN, D D PERRIN
Jul 1, 1978·Journal of Food Protection·Theron E Odlaug, Irving J Pflug
Feb 1, 1982·Journal of Food Protection·Nobumasa Tanaka

Citations

Feb 1, 1988·International Journal of Food Microbiology·T F Brocklehurst, B M Lund
Sep 17, 1999·International Journal of Food Microbiology·S Brul, Peter J Coote
Jan 1, 1988·Society for Applied Bacteriology Symposium Series·A D Russell, G W Gould
Jan 14, 2004·Microbiological Research·Han-Chul KangSeung-Joo Go
Feb 5, 2019·Journal of Food Science·Joshua E HerskovitzJulie M Goddard

Related Concepts

Calcium
Citrates
Clostridium botulinum
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Iron
Magnesium
Manganese
Oxidation-Reduction
Spores, Bacterial
Uralyt U

Related Feeds

Botulism

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum. Discover the latest research on botulism here.

Botulism (ASM)

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum. Discover the latest research on botulism here.