The in-vitro activity of azlocillin: a community hospital study of 1900 clinical isolates

The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
M F Parry

Abstract

The in-vitro activity of azlocillin was evaluated against 1900 fresh clinical isolates from a 320-bed community hospital. Azlocillin inhibited over 90% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates at less than or equal to 16 mg/l; it was four-fold more active than ticarcillin and 8- to 16-fold more active than carbenicillin. Against members of the Enterobacteriaceae azlocillin was less active than piperacillin but still inhibited over 90% of Klebsiella, Serratia and Proteus mirabilis at achievable blood levels (less than or equal to 64 mg/l). It was the most active agent against enterococci inhibiting 80% at less than or equal to 1 mg/l. Azlocillin will be a useful addition to the antibiotic formulary of the community hospital because of its exceptional anti-pseudomonal activity.

Citations

Apr 15, 1985·American Journal of Ophthalmology·A P JohnsonW J George
May 8, 1993·Quality in Health Care : QHC·S CotterN Barber
Feb 8, 1992·Quality in Health Care : QHC·R Batty, N Barber

Related Concepts

Bacteriocidal Agents
Azlocillin sodium
Bacterial Infections
Paracolobactrum
Fungus Drug Sensitivity Tests
Penicillin
Pseudomonas
Genus staphylococcus

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