Jan 1, 1975

The influence of bacterial superinfection on the clinical course of influenza. Studies from the influenza epidemics in Stockholm during the winters 1969-70 and 1971-72

Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases
C Jarstrand, G Tunevall

Abstract

During two epidemics of influenza A infection in Stockholm 1969-72, 249 cases were selected for a study on the effect of bacterial superinfection. Bacterial involvement was demonstrated through cultures and serologic reactions. The occurrence of C-reactive protein in increased amount in serum was significantly more common in the group which had the strongest indication of bacterial infection. An increased duration of fever, and a higher incidence of pneumonia, leukocytosis and erythrocyte sedimentation rate over 50 mm/l h was also the rule in cases with bacterial involvement. During both epidemics the bacteria most often involved were pneumococci.

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Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Superinfection
C-reactive Protein Measurement
Haemophilus influenzae
Leukocytosis
Influenza virus vaccine
Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Measurement
Influenza
Streptococcus
Experimental Lung Inflammation
Staphylococcus aureus

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