The influence of urinary pH on antibiotic efficacy against bacterial uropathogens

Urology
Luo YangPeter A Cadieux

Abstract

To determine the effects of pH on the activity of clinically relevant antibiotics against bacterial uropathogens. Numerous factors affect antibiotic efficacy within the urinary tract including pH. Because human urine can substantially vary from acidic (pH 4.5) to alkaline (pH 8) conditions and can be easily clinically manipulated, it would be a great advantage to better understand the role of pH in antibiotic treatment of urinary tract infection. This in vitro study investigated the activity of 24 widely used antimicrobial agents against bacterial strains comprising 6 major uropathogenic species (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) over the range of pH 5-8. Standard disk-diffusion and broth-microdilution assays were used. One-way analysis of variance was applied to determine significance (P <.05). For 18 of the 24 agents, pH was shown to play a significant role in overall inhibitory activity. Although most agents behaved similarly across most or all of the uropathogens tested, several only showed pH-dependent effects against certain organisms. The fluoroquinolones, co-trimoxazole, aminoglycosides, and macrolides all func...Continue Reading

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Mar 17, 2018·Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association·Carla D McArdleDavid A McDowell
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Related Concepts

Aminoglycosides
Bacteriocidal Agents
Diffusion
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Fungus Drug Sensitivity Tests
Macrodantin
Quinolines
Sulfonamides
Tetracyclines
Trimpex

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