The interaction of Trypanosoma congolense and Haemonchus contortus infections in trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle

Veterinary Parasitology
J KaufmannK Pfister

Abstract

The interactions between Trypanosoma congolense and Haemonchus contortus infections were studied in N'Dama calves. A total of 38 N'Dama bulls was divided into four groups and each group infected either with H. contortus 1 week after infection with T. congolense or with T. congolense 4 weeks after infection with H. contortus, or with either infection singly. Parasitological (faecal egg counts, parasitaemia), haematological (packed cell volume, white blood cell counts, albumin) and clinical parameters (body weight change, mortality rate) were compared among the various groups. The results showed a reduced prepatent period and a markedly increased pathogenicity of H. contortus infections in animals with a concurrent T. congolense infection. The most harmful combination was a H. contortus infection 1 week after the T. congolense infection which resulted in a progressive and severe anaemia, accompanied by hypoalbuminaemia, increased weight loss and high mortality. The anaemia induced by dual infections showed a low responsiveness to chemotherapy and in several cases supportive treatment did not help recovery. The results also showed that animals with a concurrent T. congolense and H. contortus infection ran a higher risk of succumbi...Continue Reading

References

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Citations

Mar 23, 2001·Journal of Leukocyte Biology·B NamangalaA Beschin
Feb 19, 1998·International Journal for Parasitology·B GoossensS Geerts
Sep 29, 1999·International Journal for Parasitology·D N Onah, D Wakelin
Jan 1, 2003·Research in Veterinary Science·S N ChiejinaP K Goyal
Sep 21, 2000·Veterinary Parasitology·D K SharmaR D Agrawal
Aug 10, 2012·Parasites & Vectors·Erick O MungubePeter-Henning Clausen
Feb 21, 2014·Parasitology·Ilana Conradie Van WykBanie L Penzhorn
Mar 7, 2015·Parasite : Journal De La Société Française De Parasitologie·Samuel N ChiejinaBarineme B Fakae
May 20, 2017·Journal of Pathogens·Lucas Atehmengo NgongehGurama Kansalem Samson
Sep 5, 2018·Tropical Animal Health and Production·Paul Olalekan OdeniranSusan Christina Welburn
Jan 17, 2017·Animal : an International Journal of Animal Bioscience·A TraoréF Goyache

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