Dec 18, 2012

The missing link of Jewish European ancestry: contrasting the Rhineland and the Khazarian hypotheses

Genome Biology and Evolution
Eran Elhaik

Abstract

The question of Jewish ancestry has been the subject of controversy for over two centuries and has yet to be resolved. The "Rhineland hypothesis" depicts Eastern European Jews as a "population isolate" that emerged from a small group of German Jews who migrated eastward and expanded rapidly. Alternatively, the "Khazarian hypothesis" suggests that Eastern European Jews descended from the Khazars, an amalgam of Turkic clans that settled the Caucasus in the early centuries CE and converted to Judaism in the 8th century. Mesopotamian and Greco-Roman Jews continuously reinforced the Judaized empire until the 13th century. Following the collapse of their empire, the Judeo-Khazars fled to Eastern Europe. The rise of European Jewry is therefore explained by the contribution of the Judeo-Khazars. Thus far, however, the Khazars' contribution has been estimated only empirically, as the absence of genome-wide data from Caucasus populations precluded testing the Khazarian hypothesis. Recent sequencing of modern Caucasus populations prompted us to revisit the Khazarian hypothesis and compare it with the Rhineland hypothesis. We applied a wide range of population genetic analyses to compare these two hypotheses. Our findings support the Khaza...Continue Reading

  • References30
  • Citations13

Mentioned in this Paper

European Continental Ancestry Group
School Age Population
Isolate compound
Sequencing
Contrast Used
Korean Race
Mosaic Organism
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Genome, Human
Jews

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