The Parkland Memorial Hospital protocol for treatment of eclampsia: evaluation of 245 cases

American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
J A PritchardS A Pritchard

Abstract

Since 1955, a standardized treatment regimen has been used to manage 245 cases of eclampsia at Parkland Memorial Hospital. Magnesium sulfate alone effectively controlled controlled convulsions in the great majority of cases. The only maternal death among the 245 cases reemphasizes the risk of respiratory arrest that is inherent in the administration of magnesium sulfate when given in large doses intravenously. Hydralazine to lower the diastolic blood pressure somewhat, when it was 110 mm Hg or higher, prevented intracranial hemorrhage. Avoidance of diuretics and hyperosmotic agents and limitation of fluid intake were not associated with severe renal failure. Pulmonary edema was rare. Vaginal delivery was achieved in the majority of cases. Oxytocin often proved effective for initiating and maintaining labor even remote from term. The results obtained with this regimen justify its continued clinical application.

References

Jul 1, 1978·Stain Technology·P T DonaldsonR D Lillie
Apr 1, 1983·The Journal of Clinical Investigation·T F Ferris, E K Weir
Jan 1, 1949·American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology·W F MENGERTW W BROWN

❮ Previous
Next ❯

Citations

Feb 1, 1989·American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology·W L Koontz, K H Reid
Apr 1, 1995·American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology·F G CunninghamC Hernandez
Apr 1, 1995·Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology·S V ThomasR Radhakumari
Jun 1, 1995·International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics : the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics·N V Raman, C A Rao
Oct 23, 1992·European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology·J M SwartjesO P Bleker
Mar 1, 1996·European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology·J J Walker
Jun 5, 1993·Lancet·C W Redman, J M Roberts
Sep 1, 1995·The Journal of Emergency Medicine·W J BradyC T Carter
Mar 1, 1996·The Journal of Emergency Medicine·R J Vissers, R Purssell
Oct 1, 1991·Epilepsy Research·R S Fisher
Nov 12, 2002·Brain Research·M C DorettoE Osório-Neto
Mar 7, 2002·International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics : the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics·N Kuno, K Ishikawa
Mar 24, 1998·International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics : the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics·M ShaarawyM Sheiba
Apr 30, 1998·Journal of the Neurological Sciences·S V Thomas
May 10, 2003·Obstetrics and Gynecology·Sarah H Poggi, Alessandro Ghidini
Oct 30, 1998·Obstetrics and Gynecology·A G Witlin, B M Sibai
Jun 1, 1996·Journal of Emergency Nursing : JEN : Official Publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association·M A Frakes
Jun 20, 1987·Lancet·R M SlaterJ M Anderton
Jan 1, 1997·Pharmacology & Therapeutics·S M KhedunB Maharaj
May 29, 2000·European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology·T K Eskes
Mar 28, 1998·Neurologic Clinics·J GilmoreB J Stern
Dec 24, 1997·The Journal of Emergency Medicine·W J Brady, J S Huff
Apr 16, 1998·The Journal of Emergency Medicine·D R PowersJ D Wallin
Jan 29, 2005·International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia·C L ChiuY K Chan
Aug 24, 2004·International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia·S C Robson
Sep 7, 2002·The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research·Mosammat Rashida BegumEhsan Quadir
Jul 27, 1995·The New England Journal of Medicine·M J LucasF G Cunningham
Jan 1, 1989·The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis·C H Smith
Dec 14, 2012·British Journal of Anaesthesia·W F S Sellers
Apr 29, 1999·Current Opinion in Obstetrics & Gynecology·D O Anumba, S C Robson
Aug 19, 1999·Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology·A G Witlin
Jun 6, 2002·Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology·Errol R NorwitzJohn T Repke
Jun 14, 2003·The Neurologist·P W Kaplan
Oct 11, 2005·Critical Care Medicine·Edward R Yeomans, Larry C Gilstrap
Aug 19, 2006·Critical Care Medicine·Gerda G Zeeman
Feb 24, 2005·Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology·Kjersti M Aagaard-Tillery, Michael A Belfort
Apr 5, 2005·Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology·Baha M Sibai
Sep 19, 2006·Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey·Michael A BelfortBaha Sibai
Oct 26, 1999·The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research·H SawhneyK Vasishta
Feb 13, 2009·Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation·Anna G Euser, Marilyn J Cipolla
Jun 1, 1992·The Journal of Clinical Investigation·E K D'AngeloC M Rembold

❮ Previous
Next ❯

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Antihypertensive Agents: Mechanisms of Action

Antihypertensive drugs are used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure) which aims to prevent the complications of high blood pressure, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Discover the latest research on antihypertensive drugs and their mechanism of action here.