PMID: 1847748Jan 1, 1991Paper

The regulation of quantal size

Progress in Neurobiology
William Van der Kloot

Abstract

Quantal size can be altered experimentally by numerous treatments that seem to lack any common thread. The observations may seem haphazard and senseless unless clear distinctions are made from the outset. Some treatments shift the size of the entire population of quanta. These quanta are released by nerve stimulation. Other treatments add quanta of abnormal size or shape--monstrosities--to the population (4.0). Usually, perhaps even invariably, the monstrosities are not released by nerve stimulation. 6.1. POPULATION SIZE INCREASES. 6.1.1. Quantal size must be regulated. The size of the entire quantal population can be experimentally shifted to a larger size, with the mean rising two- or even four-fold. Before these observations, it was reasonable to suppose that quantal size was relatively fixed, with little room for maneuver. A logical picture is that synaptic vesicles have a maximum transmitter capacity, and usually they are filled to the brim. This picture is wrong. The quantity of transmitter packaged in the quantum must be regulated by the neuron, so depending on circumstances, quantal size can be increased or decreased. Figure 18 makes the case for regulation more strongly than words. We are beginning to identify some of ...Continue Reading

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Citations

Jun 1, 1992·Journal of Neuroscience Research·J VautrinJ Holsapple
Jan 1, 1995·European Biophysics Journal : EBJ·R A GiniatullinF Vyskocil
Jul 18, 2012·Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine·O I SkitevaO P Balezina
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Jun 11, 2008·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·Michal BajoMarisa Roberto
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Sep 24, 2011·The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience·Bin PanQing-song Liu
Oct 25, 2013·Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology·Xiaojie LiuQing-song Liu
Oct 31, 2013·Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology·Marsida KallupiMarisa Roberto

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