May 12, 2011

The role of 5-hydroxytryptamine 7 receptors in the phencyclidine-induced novel object recognition deficit in rats

The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Masakuni HoriguchiHerbert Y Meltzer

Abstract

The role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT)(7) receptor antagonism in the actions of atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs), e.g., amisulpride, clozapine, and lurasidone, if any, is uncertain. We examined the ability of 5-HT(7) receptor antagonism alone and as a component of amisulpride and lurasidone to reverse deficits in rat novel object recognition (NOR) produced by subchronic treatment with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP), and we examined the ability of supplemental 5-HT(7) antagonism to augment the inability of sulpiride, haloperidol, and (1R,4R,5S,6R)-4-amino-2-oxabicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268), a metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 2/3 agonist, which lack 5-HT(7) antagonism, to reverse the NOR deficit. The 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine (SB269970) (0.1-1 mg/kg) dose-dependently reversed PCP-induced NOR deficits. In addition, the ability of lurasidone (0.1 mg/kg) and amisulpride (3 mg/kg) to reverse this deficit was blocked by cotreatment with the 5-HT(7) receptor agonist (2S)-(+)-5-(1,3,5-trimethylpyrazol-4-yl)-2-(dimethylamino)tetralin (AS19) (5-10 mg/kg), which did not affect ...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Amisulpride
Atypical Antipsychotic [EPC]
n-hexane
Neurologic Manifestations
Propionic acid
Assay OF Haloperidol
Pyrrolidine
Schizophrenia
Serotonin Measurement
Phencyclidine Hydrobromide

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