The Staphylococcus aureus Membrane Protein SA2056 Interacts with Peptidoglycan Synthesis Enzymes

Antibiotics
Chantal QuiblierMaria M Senn

Abstract

The yet uncharacterized membrane protein SA2056 belongs to the ubiquitous RND (Resistance-Nodulation-cell Division) family of transmembrane efflux transporters. The sa2056 gene is located downstream of femX, the gene encoding the essential, non-ribosomal peptidyl-transferase adding the first glycine in the staphylococcal cell wall pentaglycine interpeptide. Due to its proximity to and weak co-transcription with femX, we assumed that sa2056 may somehow be involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Specific antibodies against SA2056 showed that this protein is expressed during growth and present in the membrane fraction of cell preparations. Using a bacterial two hybrid system, SA2056 was shown to interact (i) with itself, (ii) with FemB, which adds glycines 4 and 5 to the peptidoglycan interpeptide and (iii) with the essential penicillin binding proteins, PBP1 and PBP2, required for cell division and incorporation of the peptidoglycan into the cell wall. Unexpectedly, deletion of sa2056 led to no phenotype regarding growth, antibiotic resistances or cell morphology; nor did sa2056 deletion in combination with femB inactivation alter b-lactam and lysostaphin sensitivity and resistance, respectively, pointing to possible redundancy in t...Continue Reading

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Methods Mentioned

BETA
transglycosylation
two
pull-down
Two-Hybrid
PCR
electrophoresis
Assay
light scattering

Related Concepts

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Bacterial Cell Wall Structure (ASM)

Bacterial cell walls are made of peptidoglycan (also called murein), which is made from polysaccharide chains cross-linked by unusual peptides containing D-amino acids. Here is the latest research on bacterial cell wall structures.

Bacterial Cell Wall Structure

Bacterial cell walls are made of peptidoglycan (also called murein), which is made from polysaccharide chains cross-linked by unusual peptides containing D-amino acids. Here is the latest research on bacterial cell wall structures.