Jul 10, 2016

The Time and Place of European Admixture in the Ashkenazi Jewish History

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
James XueShai Carmi

Abstract

The Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population is important in medical genetics due to its high rate of Mendelian disorders and other unique genetic characteristics. Ashkenazi Jews have appeared in Europe in the 10th century, and their ancestry is thought to involve an admixture of European (EU) and Middle-Eastern (ME) groups. However, both the time and place of admixture in Europe are obscure and subject to intense debate. Here, we attempt to characterize the Ashkenazi admixture history using a large Ashkenazi sample and careful application of new and existing methods. Our main approach is based on local ancestry inference, assigning each Ashkenazi genomic segment as EU or ME, and comparing allele frequencies across EU segments to those of different EU populations. The contribution of each EU source was also evaluated using GLOBETROTTER and analysis of IBD sharing. The time of admixture was inferred using multiple tools, relying on statistics such as the distributions of segment lengths and the total EU ancestry per chromosome and the correlation of ancestries along the chromosome. Our simulations demonstrated that distinguishing EU vs ME ancestry is subject to considerable noise at the single segment level, but nevertheless, conclusion...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Genome
Medical Genetics Specialty
Genome Assembly Sequence
Accessory for Intravenous Admixture Preparation
Genomics
Chromosomes
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Simulation
Analysis
Place

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