PMID: 7606373Jul 1, 1995Paper

The use of cryopreserved human skin allografts in wound healing following Mohs surgery

Dermatologic Surgery : Official Publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et Al.]
S A Kolenik, D J Leffell

Abstract

Immediate reconstruction has become the preferred approach to management of full-thickness cutaneous defects following microscopically controlled excision (MCE) of tumors. In a minority of patients, however, large reconstructive procedures are contraindicated, and a long-term biological dressing that stimulates healing while minimizing wound care is desirable. To assess the utility of cryopreserved human skin allografts (HSA) in wound care and wound healing following Mohs surgery. Sixteen patients were treated with HSA following MCE and followed postoperatively for evidence of infection, involution, or survival of HSA, and granulation tissue production. Follow-up was 2-26 months. The use of HSA resulted in one of three general outcomes: rapid healing and rejection, subsequent full-thickness skin grafting, or persistence of HSA during prolonged healing. HSA are a safe alternative to immediate reconstruction in a carefully selected population of skin cancer patients. They minimize wound care while providing continuous wound coverage during healing, and are an efficient bridge to full-thickness skin grafting.

References

Feb 1, 1978·Transplantation·J L NinnemannH A Frank
Dec 1, 1978·The Surgical Clinics of North America·M J TavisR H Bartlett
Dec 3, 1992·The New England Journal of Medicine·D S Preston, R S Stern
Jan 1, 1991·Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery·B F Alsbjörn
Sep 1, 1990·The Journal of Burn Care & Rehabilitation·S A SakabuG Greenleaf
Oct 1, 1988·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·A S Rosenberg, A Singer
Jan 1, 1989·British Journal of Plastic Surgery·J D FrameB D Morgan
Apr 25, 1987·Lancet·J A Clarke
Oct 1, 1985·The British Journal of Dermatology·D R SynkowskiJ C Orlando
May 1, 1980·Archives of Dermatology·B L O'DellE B Smith

Citations

Jul 27, 2001·Wound Repair and Regeneration : Official Publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society·O T PajuloJ Viljanto
May 6, 2009·Dermatologic Surgery : Official Publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et Al.]·Andrew P KontosSteven A Proper
Feb 18, 2011·Dermatologic Surgery : Official Publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et Al.]·William G StebbinsJeffrey Petersen
Mar 24, 2010·The Foot·Yusuf Kenan Coban, Ali Murat Kalender
Jul 19, 2005·Clinics in Dermatology·Michele FimianiFelice Petraglia
Jan 1, 1997·Dermatologic Clinics·M M Choucair, T J Phillips
Apr 20, 2005·Dermatologic Clinics·Wei LiDavid T Woodley
Jul 6, 2019·Dermatologic Surgery : Official Publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et Al.]·Giovanni MostiLuca Bastiani
May 6, 2005·The International Journal of Lower Extremity Wounds·Hau T PhamAristidis Veves
Feb 16, 2010·The Journal of Trauma·Nele BrusselaersStan Monstrey

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Carcinoma, Squamous Cell

Basal cell carcinoma is a form of malignant skin cancer found on the head and neck regions and has low rates of metastasis. Discover the latest research on basal cell carcinoma here.

Carcinoma, Basal Cell

Basal cell carcinoma is a form of malignant skin cancer found on the head and neck regions and has low rates of metastasis. Discover the latest research on basal cell carcinoma here.

Allogenic & Autologous Therapies

Allogenic therapies are generated in large batches from unrelated donor tissues such as bone marrow. In contrast, autologous therapies are manufactures as a single lot from the patient being treated. Here is the latest research on allogenic and autologous therapies.