PMID: 3138191Jan 1, 1988

Therapy of experimental listeriosis--an evaluation of different antibiotics

Infection
Herbert Hof, G Waldenmeier

Abstract

The therapeutic activities of various antibiotics were evaluated in two murine models, i.e. the infection of normal mice as well as of nude mice. Coumermycin and rifampicin were the most active drugs, since not only inhibition of multiplication but also rapid elimination of Listeria monocytogenes could be achieved in normal and immunocompromised animals. Ampicillin was the most active beta-lactam antibiotic followed by azlocillin. The other beta-lactam antibiotics were definitely less active. The combination of ampicillin with gentamicin expressed no synergistic effect in vivo. Co-trimoxazole as well as ciprofloxacin were of moderate therapeutic value. The bacteriostatic drugs such as tetracycline and erythromycin were able to inhibit the bacterial multiplication in the normal mouse but not in the immunocompromised host. Thus an optimal drug for therapy of listeriosis does not yet exist.

References

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Jul 1, 1986·The Journal of Infection·Herbert Hof
Jun 16, 1967·Deutsche medizinische Wochenschrift·L Weingärtner, S Ortel
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Citations

Jan 1, 1995·Indian Journal of Pediatrics·R C Gordon
Jun 25, 2008·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·Solène GrayoAlban Le Monnier
Mar 1, 1994·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·C MicheletP Berche
Apr 17, 2012·Applied and Environmental Microbiology·Louise FeldLone Gram
Sep 24, 2013·Applied and Environmental Microbiology·Gitte M KnudsenLone Gram
May 14, 2004·European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases : Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology·S StepanovićR Kos
Mar 1, 1995·European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases : Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology·E M Jones, A P MacGowan
Jan 1, 1991·Infection·Herbert Hof
Jan 6, 2001·Medicine·A S Hussein, S D Shafran
Aug 10, 2002·Medicine·Eleftherios MylonakisEdward J Wing
Jul 22, 2004·Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy·Herbert Hof
Jun 28, 2016·Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases·S ThønningsDanish Collaborative Bacteraemia Network (DACOBAN)
Jul 2, 1999·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·C MicheletM G Täuber

Related Concepts

Coumermycin sodium
Antibiotics
Coumarins
Lactims
Listeriosis
Listeria monocytogenes
Mice, Inbred Strains
Mice, Nude
Tubocin
Aminocoumarins

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