DOI: 10.1101/489328Dec 7, 2018Paper

Tick-borne pathogen detection in midgut and salivary glands of adult Ixodes ricinus

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Emilie LejalThomas Pollet

Abstract

Background: Tick midgut and salivary glands represent the primary organs for pathogen acquisition and transmission, respectively. Specifically, the midgut is the first organ to have contact with pathogens during the blood meal uptake, while salivary glands along with their secretions play a crucial role in pathogen transmission to the host. Currently there is little data about pathogen composition and prevalences in I. ricinus midgut and salivary glands. The present study investigated the presence of 32 pathogen species in the midgut and salivary glands of unfed I. ricinus males and females using high-throughput microfluidic real-time PCR. Such an approach is important for enriching the knowledge about pathogen distribution in distinct tick organs which should lead to a better understanding I. ricinus-borne disease epidemiology. Results: Borrelia lusitaniae, Borrelia spielmanii, and Borrelia garinii, were detected in both midgut and salivary glands suggesting that the migration of these pathogens between these two organs might not be triggered by the blood meal. In contrast, Borrelia afzelii was detected only in the tick midgut. Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Rickettsia helvetica were the most frequently detected in ticks and we...Continue Reading

Related Concepts

Birth
Blood
Epidemiology
Salivary Glands
Ticks
Tick-Borne Infections
Organ
Disks (Device)
Primitive Midgut Structure
Disease Transmission

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