Toxocariasis and Wells' syndrome: a causal relationship?

Dermatology : International Journal for Clinical and Investigative Dermatology
M A HurniT Hunziker

Abstract

The etiology of Wells' syndrome or eosinophilic cellulitis is unknown. Various triggering factors, such as myeloproliferative disorders, lymphoma, infections/infestations, insect bites and drugs have been reported. In 1979, Wells was the first who pointed out some common features of eosinophilic cellulitis and skin lesions in toxocariasis. We report 2 patients who exhibited the characteristic clinical and histological features of Wells's syndrome together with elevated antibody titers to the excretory-secretory antigen of Toxocara canis. In both patients, the skin lesions disappeared after oral albendazole treatment and no recurrences were observed. The clinical response was followed by a normalization of the Toxocara antibody titer. In contrast, a patient with eczematoid skin lesions, eosinophilia and an elevated Toxocara antibody titer did not benefit from albendazole treatment despite serological normalization. Taken together, these cases lend support to a causal relationship of Toxocara in selected patients with Wells' syndrome.

Citations

Dec 31, 2009·Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan Yi Zhi·Hsing-Lin LinWei-Che Lee
Apr 3, 2002·Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology·James T Jaing, E Richard Stiehm
Aug 22, 2000·The British Journal of Dermatology·D CanonneE Delaporte
May 1, 2001·International Journal of Dermatology·D Seçkin, B Demirhan
Feb 13, 2003·International Journal of Dermatology·Meena Moossavi, Darius R Mehregan
Mar 1, 2002·The Australasian Journal of Dermatology·Li-Chuen WongMaureen Rogers
Jun 3, 2009·Southern Medical Journal·Wesam H Moustafa HusseinWilliam Rodriguez
Nov 29, 2008·Cases Journal·Ioannis D BassukasChristina Stergiopoulou
Apr 17, 2015·Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology·Hai LongQianjin Lu
Dec 1, 2017·Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association·Christine L CainElizabeth A Mauldin
Jun 10, 2004·Journal of Cutaneous Pathology·Jane M Lynch, Terry L Barrett
Aug 25, 2004·Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV·M S RossiniI Lorand-Metze
Aug 17, 2006·The British Journal of Dermatology·T ZeeliM David
Jun 27, 2012·Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV·M El-KhalawanyD Shaaban
Jun 22, 2013·International Journal of Dermatology·Gudrun RatzingerBernhard Zelger

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Anthelmintics (ASM)

Anthelmintics or antihelminthics are a group of antiparasitic drugs that expel parasitic worms (helminths) and other internal parasites from the body by either stunning or killing them and without causing significant damage to the host. Discover the latest research on anthelmintics here.

Anthelmintics

Anthelmintics or antihelminthics are a group of antiparasitic drugs that expel parasitic worms (helminths) and other internal parasites from the body by either stunning or killing them and without causing significant damage to the host. Discover the latest research on anthelmintics here.

Related Papers

Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Seong Joon AhnKyu Hyung Park
Ocular Immunology and Inflammation
Katsutoshi YokoiMasahiko Usui
Anales de pediatría : publicación oficial de la Asociación Española de Pediatría (A.E.P.)
J AltchehH Freilij
© 2021 Meta ULC. All rights reserved