Mar 3, 2010

Transit through the flea vector induces a pretransmission innate immunity resistance phenotype in Yersinia pestis

PLoS Pathogens
Viveka VadyvalooB Joseph Hinnebusch

Abstract

Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, is transmitted to mammals by infected fleas. Y. pestis exhibits a distinct life stage in the flea, where it grows in the form of a cohesive biofilm that promotes transmission. After transmission, the temperature shift to 37 degrees C induces many known virulence factors of Y. pestis that confer resistance to innate immunity. These factors are not produced in the low-temperature environment of the flea, however, suggesting that Y. pestis is vulnerable to the initial encounter with innate immune cells at the flea bite site. In this study, we used whole-genome microarrays to compare the Y. pestis in vivo transcriptome in infective fleas to in vitro transcriptomes in temperature-matched biofilm and planktonic cultures, and to the previously characterized in vivo gene expression profile in the rat bubo. In addition to genes involved in metabolic adaptation to the flea gut and biofilm formation, several genes with known or predicted roles in resistance to innate immunity and pathogenicity in the mammal were upregulated in the flea. Y. pestis from infected fleas were more resistant to phagocytosis by macrophages than in vitro-grown bacteria, in part attributable to a cluster of insecticidal-like t...Continue Reading

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  • Citations55

Mentioned in this Paper

Metabolic Process, Cellular
Neuro-Oncological Ventral Antigen 2
Pathogenic Aspects
Biochemical Pathway
Immune System
Microarray Analysis
Amidophosphoribosyltransferase
Biological Adaptation to Stress
Carbohydrate nutrients
Adhesins, Bacterial

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