PMID: 2595621Oct 1, 1989

Treatment of adult asthma: is the diagnosis relevant?

Thorax
P LittlejohnsR Anderson

Abstract

The diagnosis and management of chronic respiratory symptoms was studied in all adults aged 40-70 years in a group general practice. A respiratory symptoms screening questionnaire was sent to 2387 men and women, of whom 1444 (85% of those who had not moved or died) responded. The 509 subjects reporting symptoms were sent a detailed questionnaire and invited to have their respiratory function tested. Of these, 324 (64%) responded, of whom 256 (79%) had spirometry. A diagnosis of chronic bronchitis was reported by 3.9% of the men and 2.1% of the women, and a diagnosis of asthma by 4.7% of the men and 3.3% of the women. Wheezing in the preceding year was reported by 18% of the men and 15% of the women, and 16.7% of the men and 7.1% of the women satisfied the Medical Research Council criteria for chronic bronchitis. Bronchodilator treatment was being taken by 12% of the patients with symptoms, regular cough linctus by 10%, and regular antibiotics by 5%. After the frequency and severity of respiratory symptoms had been controlled for wheezing patients reporting a diagnosis of asthma were prescribed bronchodilatory drugs three times more often than those labelled as having chronic bronchitis and 12 times more often than those without...Continue Reading

References

Feb 1, 1978·Thorax·A Seaton
Apr 1, 1978·Archives of Disease in Childhood·H R Anderson
Jun 10, 1989·BMJ : British Medical Journal·P LittlejohnsR Anderson
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Citations

May 20, 2003·Respirology : Official Journal of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology·Regional COPD Working Group
Feb 8, 2000·Surgery·P J Drew, J R Monson
Nov 30, 2007·International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease·David M G Halpin
Jun 1, 1993·The Journal of Primary Prevention·P V Trad

Related Concepts

Antitussive Agents
Asthma
Bronchitis
Broncholytic Effect
Patient Referral

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