Trends in asthma therapy in the United States: 1965-1992

Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology
A I Terr, D A Bloch

Abstract

Many recent studies indicate an increasing morbidity and mortality of asthma in the past two decades. This study uses data from the National Disease and Therapeutic Index (NDTI) to document and analyze trends in drug therapy for asthma in the United States from 1965 through 1992. The NDTI maintains a continuous rotating national sampling of approximately 1% of US physicians in office-based practice proportionately representative of practicing generalists and specialists who report issuance of drugs in treatment by diagnosis for all patient encounters for a period of two days every 3 months. Annual summaries of five demographic categories and 14 drug categories, characterizing the asthma patient-physician encounters as percent of visits for the 28-year period of 1965 through 1992 are analyzed and characterized. Physician visits for asthma treatment have shifted somewhat from generalists to specialists in internal medicine and pediatrics. Allergists treat a significant proportion of the asthmatic population. Most patients are seen in the office. There has been no significant change in rates of inpatient visits. Age distribution of the population of patient visits for asthma has been stable, but there is a steady drop in ratio of ...Continue Reading

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Citations

Jun 30, 2000·Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology·P J Hannaway
Sep 12, 2000·Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology·R M Sly
Apr 1, 1997·Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology·R M Sly, R O'Donnell
Jan 28, 2003·Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology·R M Sly
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