PMID: 14679053Dec 18, 2003Paper

Type 1 diabetes in Swedish bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus): signs of disease in both colonized and wild cyclic populations at peak density

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Bo NiklassonA Lernmark

Abstract

Colonized bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) originating from Sweden developed type 1 diabetes. Animals became polydipsic, glucosuric, and hyperglycemic and gradually developed a lethal ketoacidosis. Pancreas in animals with end-stage disease showed total destruction of islet cells. Interestingly, also a high proportion of wild bank voles in cyclic populations that were trapped at (or close to) the cyclic population density peak frequently showed high blood glucose levels and pathological glucose tolerance test. Extensive islet destruction was not seen in wild bank voles at the time of capture, but did develop in some of the animals over a time period of two months. Diabetes in both colonized and wild bank voles was associated with Ljungan virus (LV). LV could be isolated from the pancreas of diabetic bank voles and antigen detected at the site of tissue damage by immunohistochemistry. In addition, picornavirus-like particles were visualized in the islets of diabetic voles using thin-section transmission electron microscopy.

References

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Citations

Apr 5, 2007·Diabetologia·Bo NiklassonWilliam Klitz
Sep 30, 2005·Proceedings. Biological Sciences·Birger HörnfeldtUlf Eklund
Feb 9, 2012·Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine·Ken T CoppietersMatthias von Herrath
Feb 5, 2010·Environmental Health : a Global Access Science Source·Richard J Q McNallyTim D Cheetham
Apr 12, 2008·Journal of Virological Methods·Conny TolfA Michael Lindberg
Jan 6, 2009·Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences·Sreevalsam GopinathCarani B Sanjeevi
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Oct 14, 2008·Birth Defects Research. Part B, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology·Annika SamsioeWilliam Klitz
Jan 8, 2013·General and Comparative Endocrinology·Aleksandra BartelikAlicja Józkowicz
Feb 14, 2017·Journal of Wildlife Diseases·Cristina FevolaHeidi C Hauffe
Jul 18, 2018·Pediatric Diabetes·Åshild Olsen Faresjö, J Ludvigsson
Aug 9, 2006·Birth Defects Research. Part B, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology·Annika SamsioeBo Niklasson
Mar 6, 2007·Birth Defects Research. Part A, Clinical and Molecular Teratology·Bo NiklassonWilliam Klitz
Oct 7, 2010·Epidemiology·Richard J Q McNallyTim D Cheetham
Oct 5, 2010·Birth Defects Research. Part A, Clinical and Molecular Teratology·Henry F Krous, Neil E Langlois
Jul 22, 2016·Lab Animal·Gregory D Larsen

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