Ultrastructural and chemotaxonomic analysis of a xylanolytic strain of Cryptococcus adeliensis isolated from sheep droppings in Spain

Archives of Microbiology
Encarna VelázquezTomás González-Villa

Abstract

Cryptococcus adeliensis was initially described as a psycrophilic species containing a single strain CBS 8351(T) isolated from decayed algae in Terre Adelie (Antartida). Later, a second strain of this species was isolated from an immunosuppressed patient affected by leukaemia in Germany and recently several strains from this species have been found in human patients and pigeon droppings of the same country. In this study, we isolated from sheep droppings in Spain a xylanolytic strain named LEVX01 that was phenotypically related to the strain CBS 8351(T) and showed a 100% similarity in the D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS region sequences with respect to the remaining described strains of C. adeliensis. These findings suggest that this species has a wide geographical distribution and that the animal faeces are a common habitat for C. adeliensis. The chemotaxonomic analyses showed the absence of detectable amounts of xylose in the cell walls of the strains LEVX01 and CBS8351(T) in contrast to other Cryptococcus species. Interestingly, the ultrastructural study showed the presence of fimbriae in these two strains that could be involved in the attachment to the host cells and, as occurs in Candida albicans, they could also be a pathogenic...Continue Reading

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Related Concepts

Bos indicus
Cell Wall
Cryptococcus
DNA, Ribosomal
Feces
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Dall Sheep
Xylans
Xylose
Sequence Determinations, DNA

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