Upper quadrant postural changes of school children in response to interaction with different information technologies

Ergonomics
Andrew BriggsAlison Greig

Abstract

The objective of this study was to quantitatively analyse the sitting posture of school children interacting with both old (book) and new (laptop and desktop computers) information technologies to test the hypothesis that posture is effected by the type of information technology (IT) used. A mixed model design was used to test the effect of IT type (within subjects) and age and gender (between subjects). The sitting posture of 32 children aged 4-17 years was measured whilst they read from a book, laptop, and desktop computer at a standard school chair and desk. Video images were captured and then digitized to calculate mean angles for head tilt, neck flexion, trunk flexion, and gaze angle. Posture was found to be influenced by IT type (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001) and gender (p = 0.024) and significantly correlated to the stature of the participants. Measurement of resting posture and the maximal range of motion of the upper and lower cervical spines in the sagittal plane was also undertaken. The biophysical impact and the suitability of the three different information technologies are discussed.

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Citations

Dec 22, 2007·Ergonomics·D Caple
Jun 22, 2014·BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders·Yolandi BrinkEsmè Jordaan
Feb 24, 2006·The Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy·Peter O'SullivanSharon Tsang
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Dec 4, 2014·Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics·Rodrigo Miguel RuivoAna Isabel Carita
Dec 3, 2013·BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders·Yolandi BrinkEsmè Jordaan
Jun 24, 2016·Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health·Eugenia Hc WooChristopher Wk Lai
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Jul 15, 2020·Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics·Sarah Mingels, Marita Granitzer
Aug 20, 2018·Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics·Sarah Mingels, Marita Granitzer

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Software Mentioned

SPSS
Microvideo DC30plus
Peak Motus Motion Analysis

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