Jul 10, 2002

Use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with psoriatic arthritis

Joint, Bone, Spine : Revue Du Rhumatisme
Laurent MarguerieBernard Delcambre

Abstract

Few prospective placebo-controlled studies have evaluated disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in the treatment of peripheral psoriatic arthritis. To evaluate second-line treatments used in clinical practice in patients with psoriatic arthritis. We studied a cross-section of 100 consecutive patients seen by hospital-based or office-based rheumatologists for psoriatic arthritis. The 55 men and 45 women had a mean age of 48 years (range, 17-79 years) and a mean disease duration of 7 years (range, 1-24 years). The most commonly used DMARDs were sulfasalazine, gold, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine (64, 43, 41 et 17 patients, respectively). These drugs had been stopped because of inefficacy in 31%, 31%, 12%, and 53% of patients, respectively, and because of adverse events in 23%, 44%, 22%, and 41% of patients, respectively. At the time of the study, mean treatment durations were 15, 21, 34, and 12 months, respectively, and the drugs were still being used in 45%, 21%, 66%, and 6% of patients. Our data confirm the value of methotrexate and salazopyrine. Methotrexate had the best risk/benefit ratio. Gold was often responsible for side effects. Hydroxychloroquine was inadequately effective and poorly tolerated.

  • References37
  • Citations12

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Antirheumatic Drugs, Disease-Modifying
Hydroxychloroquine
Plaquenil
Sulfasalazin medac
Salazopyrine
Adverse Event
Methotrexate
Xicil
Organogold Compounds
Methotrexate, (DL)-Isomer

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