Mar 4, 2010

Virus entry by endocytosis

Annual Review of Biochemistry
Jason MercerAri Helenius

Abstract

Although viruses are simple in structure and composition, their interactions with host cells are complex. Merely to gain entry, animal viruses make use of a repertoire of cellular processes that involve hundreds of cellular proteins. Although some viruses have the capacity to penetrate into the cytosol directly through the plasma membrane, most depend on endocytic uptake, vesicular transport through the cytoplasm, and delivery to endosomes and other intracellular organelles. The internalization may involve clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), macropinocytosis, caveolar/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis, or a variety of other still poorly characterized mechanisms. This review focuses on the cell biology of virus entry and the different strategies and endocytic mechanisms used by animal viruses.

  • References207
  • Citations428

References

  • References207
  • Citations428

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Human herpesvirus 8
SARS2 gene
SCARB1 gene
Tumor Virus Infections
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