May 1, 2020

A way to break bones? The weight of intuitiveness

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Delphine VetteseA. Borel

Abstract

The essential relationship to fat in the Middle Paleolithic, and especially to the yellow marrow, explains the importance of addressing this issue of butchery cultural practices through the study of bone fracturing gestures and techniques. In view of the quasi-systematization of bone marrow extraction in many anthropized archaeological levels, this butchery activity had to be recurrent, standardized and counter-intuitive. Thus, the highlighting of butcher traditions made possible by the analysis of the distribution of percussion marks within fossil assemblages, in particular by opposition at patterns resulting from an intuitive practice. With this in mind, we carried out an experiment that focus at the intuitive way of fracturing bones to extract marrow, involving volunteers with no previous experience in this butchery activity. The objective of this experiment was to highlight the presence or absence of a distribution pattern for percussion marks in an intuitive context by comparing several long bones and individuals. Thus, we wanted to evaluate the influence of the morphological specificity of the element and the specific characteristics of volunteers on the distribution of percussion marks during marrow extraction. Indeed, ...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Body Regions
Biochemical Pathway
Neurons
Physiologic Resolution
Structure of Cortex of Kidney
Cerebral Cortex
Diagnostic Imaging
Adrenal Cortex
Laboratory mice
46, XY Female

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